China’s Threat to the U.S. – The Atlantic

The country has become repressive in a way that it has not been since the Cultural Revolution. What does its darkening political climate—and growing belligerence—mean for the United States? via Pocket
from bitly http://theatln.tc/2fUtonw
via IFTTT

Advertisements

3D printing: customized insoles for diabetes patients

With a combination of different structures in an insole, localized rigidity is digitally adjustable. 3D structures made of TPU for insoles. These structures were designed using CAD, and their properties were simulated and compared with experiments. via Pocket
from bitly http://bit.ly/2eYCor3
via IFTTT

Crossing the Caspian | Foreign Affairs

There is no better symbol of competition and interdependency than the Caspian Sea, which connects Central Asia and Europe, and Russia to Iran and the Middle East. via Pocket
from bitly http://fam.ag/2gfjdhZ
via IFTTT

We demand single photons; carbon nanotube delivers | Ars Technica

Electrical charge is the key to modern computing. We can generate, detect, and control current with accuracy and precision. As we contemplate a world of quantum computing, it’s important to note researchers have not really coalesced around an equivalent basic architecture. via Pocket
from bitly http://bit.ly/2eYH1RP
via IFTTT

Carbon nanotube glued to waveguide: The future heart of quantum computing? | Ars Technica UK

Electrical charge is the key to modern computing. We can generate, detect, and control current with accuracy and precision. As we contemplate a world of quantum computing, it’s important to note researchers have not really coalesced around an equivalent basic architecture. via Pocket
from bitly http://bit.ly/2gffUaj
via IFTTT

www.sciencedaily.com

Source: Princeton University Summary: Researchers have built a rice grain-sized microwave laser, or ‘maser,’ powered by single electrons that demonstrates the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons. via Pocket
from bitly http://bit.ly/2gfgmp7
via IFTTT

The Future of Quantum Computing: Electron Holes

Researchers have been using electrons as qubits for the past years and have been looking for a better option due the unreliability of electrons in keeping noise out. As a nifty solution, they tried out electron holes—the positively charged voids left behind when they remove electrons. via Pocket
from bitly http://bit.ly/2eYDvan
via IFTTT